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BOOKS

Fields of Fig and Olive: Ameera and Other Stories of the Middle East

Kathryn K. Abdul-Baki

Abdul-Baki’s stories, set in Lebanon, Jordan, Kuwait, and Jerusalem, explore the themes of young women coming of age, the effects of civil war, and differences between East and West.    More >

Tower of Dreams [a novel]

Kathryn K. Abdul-Baki

An innocent yet stinging—and always absorbing—account of the lives of two young expatriate girls in Kuwait in the 1960s. Isabel, the red-headed daughter of an American mother and Arab father, befriends Laila, whose family has left the lush, cool mountains of Lebanon in search of a better life in the heat and desert of Kuwait. Abdul-Baki presents the voices of both girls, telling their    More >

The Excised [a novel]

Evelyne Accad, translated by David Bruner

Dealing with sexual mutilation, Accad’s lyrical, tragic novel shows woman as prisoner, victim, and target of man’s age-old preoccupation with domination by and fear of women. Set in exploding, agonized Lebanon, the work is Islamic, Christian, modern, and antique in scope. First published in French in 1982. This new paperback edition includes a preface by the author.    More >

The Alchemy of Glory: The Dialectic of Truthfulness and Untruthfulness in MedievalArabic Literary Criticism

Mansour Ajami

A detailed study of the literary debate among medieval Arab critics and philosophers about the use of truthfulness and untruthfulness in the poetry of the period. Emphasis on the critical schemes proposed by al-Jurjani and al-Qarta-janni. The book includes extensive notes, a bibliography, an index of personal names, and a useful glossary/index of literary and philosophical terms.    More >

Plays, Prefaces and Postscripts of Tawfiq-al-Hakim, Volume 1 : Theater of the Mind

Tawfiq al-Hakim, translated and introduced by William Maynard

Includes The Wisdom of Solomon, King Oedipus, Shahrazad, Princess Sunshine, and Angels’ Prayer.    More >

In the Tavern of Life and Other Stories

Tawfiq al-Hakim, translated by William Maynard Hutchins

This first collection of al-Hakim’s stories to be published in English includes 27 of the author’s best works written from 1927 to 1966. Some inspired by literature and others by Egyptian social conditions, the stories range from mock-autobiographical to science fiction and folk fantasy to allegory and philosophy.    More >

In the Tavern of Life and Other Stories

Fate of a Cockroach and Other Plays

Tawfiq al-Hakim, translated by Denys Johnson-Davies

Includes The Song of Death, The Sultan's Dilemma, and Not a Thing Out of Place, as well as the title play, an absurdist comedy.    More >

Fate of a Cockroach and Other Plays

Return of the Spirit [a novel]

Tawfiq al-Hakim, newly translated and with an introduction by William Maynard Hutchins

Both revolution and romance are at the heart of Return of the Spirit, first published in Arabic in 1933. The story of a patriotic young Egyptian and his extended family, ending with events surrounding the 1919 revolution—for al-Hakim, a literal awakening of the Egyptian spirit—Return of the Spirit with its strong expression of nationalist solidarity has particular resonance now.    More >

Return of the Spirit [a novel]

The Tree Climber: a play in two acts

Tawfiq al-Hakim, translated from the Arabic by Denys Johnson-Davies

In The Tree Climber, a detective, a lizard, a time-traveling dervish, and a magic tree all help to turn the quiet life of a married couple upside down. "Tawfiq al-Hakim’s plays deal with themes of universal rather than local application: the role of the artist in society, the predicament of man in the face of forces he neither controls nor understands, the use and abuse of power....    More >

Fan of Swords

Muhammad al-Maghut, translated by May Jayyusi nad Naomi Shihab Nye, with an introduction by Salma Khadra Jayyusi

Though strongly influenced by Western poetry, the work of Muhammad al-Maghut is decidedly Arab in theme. Using a set of metaphors that are new to Arab traditions, the 31 poems in this collection are both personal and political. Common to both his love poems and his works of protest is the sadness that comes from displacement and powerlessness, as well as the will to persevere in the face of evil    More >

Scheherazade in England: A Study of Nineteenth Century English Criticism of theArabian Nights

Muhsin Jassim Ali

This book challenges the widely held contention that the indebtedness of English literature to other cultures is limited to Greek and Roman influences. Ali demonstrates how deeply the Arabian Nights has penetrated English literature and culture since its publication in English in 1704–1712. His work, including a comprehensive bibliography, is central to any study of the image of the Arab    More >

Critical Perspectives on Yusuf Idris

Roger Allen, editor

Yusuf Idris is considered by many to be the greatest contemporary short-story writer working in Arabic. The 17 critical essays in this collection—some by critics in the Arab world and others by Western specialists on modern Arabic fiction and drama—are organized in sections devoted to Idris's short stories, novels, and plays. Each section includes studies that adopt a general    More >

Bab el-Oued [a novel]

Merzak Allouache, translated by Angela M. Brewer

Bored housewives, kept in seclusion, smuggling in Harlequin romances. Modish young men transformed into Islamic militants. A baker unwittingly caught in a web of intrigue, an imam whose faith is tested by urban corruption, a lonely divorcee accused of prostitution—all take part in Merzak Allouache's novel of a society on the brink of crisis. Allouache tells the story of the people of    More >

Bab el-Oued [a novel]

Finally . . . Us: Contemporary Black Brazilian Women Writers

Miriam Alves, editor and translated by Carolyn Richardson Durham

This is the first time that the literary works of contemporary Afro-Brazilian women have been compiled presenting a comprehensive vision of what it means to be both black and female in Brazil. Though the canon of Brazilian literature is rich in Afro-Brazilian female characters, until recently it has included only a handful of Afro-Brazilian women writers, sprinkled across the centuries. The    More >

Critical Perspectives on Mongo Beti

Stephen H. Arnold, editor

Mongo Beti is the most prolific and widely read author from Cameroon, and his writings have called world attention to political corruption in his native country. These essays cover the three distinct periods of Beti’s greatest activity as a writer—the first, which ran from 1953 to 1958; the re-emergence that began in 1974; and the third phase, which Arnold traces to Beti’s brief    More >

Afterimages: A Family Memoir

Carol Ascher

In her moving reflection on growing up as the daughter of refugees from Hitler's Europe, Carol Ascher explores the conflicts of an émigré childhood and chronicles her return to Vienna to uncover her father's roots.    More >

Afterimages: A Family Memoir

Lina: Portrait of a Damascene Girl

Samar Attar

A revealing study of a girl growing to maturity in middle-class Syria and of her family’s struggle to survive in the tumultuous years of 1940–1961 in Damascus. Attar’s work shows a keen eye for the daily scene, a keen ear for conversation, and a tragic sense of history. Reflecting the rapid sociopolitical changes in Syria that exalted some, but crushed others, it marks anew the    More >

Lina: Portrait of a Damascene Girl

Death in Beirut [a novel]

Tawfiq Yusuf Awwad, translated by Leslie McLoughlin

Set against the background of post-1967 Lebanon, this novel caused a sensation in the Arab world because of its frank and realistic descriptions of Lebanon's—and particularly Lebanese women's—problems. Tragedy awaits Tamina, who is drawn by the lure of the city to leave her Shia Muslim village for the university in Beirut. Injured in a student demonstration, she is rescued by    More >

Malina [a novel]

Ingeborg Bachmann, translated from the German by Philip Boehm and with an afterword by Mark Anderson

The narrator of Ingeborg Bachmann's stunning novel, Malina, tells the story of the triangle that forms between herself, the shadowy Malina, and Ivan, the man with whom she is involved. Plunging toward its riveting finale, Malina lays bare the struggle for love and the limits of discourse between women and men. A masterpiece of contemporary fiction, Malina has been translated into ten    More >

Malina [a novel]

The Thirtieth Year [stories]

Ingeborg Bachmann, translated from the German by Michael Bullock and with an introduction by Karen Achberger

From Karen Achberger's Introduction: "The seven stories of The Thirtieth Year are not narratives in the conventional sense. They are rather moments of reflection, lyrical impressions, monologues, and tightly composed images to suggest a radical rebellion against that ‘worst of all possible worlds' in which the protagonists find themselves. After a prelude ... in which a    More >

The Thirtieth Year [stories]

Three Paths to the Lake [stories]

Ingeborg Bachmann, translated from the German by Mary Fran Gilbert and with an introduction by Mark Anderson

Each of the five stories in Three Paths to a Lake, Ingeborg Bachmann's second powerful collection, is the portrait of an Austrian woman in the late 1960s living in a social order that is largely defined by men. Bachmann's narratives trace the path by which each woman is brought to an elementary state of isolation and speechlessness. But, as Mark Anderson writes in his introduction to    More >

Three Paths to the Lake [stories]

Caught in the Storm [a novel]

Seydou Badian, translated by Marie-Thérèse Noiset

A gentle novel about the enduring conflict between young and old, new and traditional, foreign and native. Badian tells the story of a village family in an African country under French rule. The family's father and the eldest son revere the customs of their ancestors, while the younger children are strongly attracted by European ways and ideas. The daughter, Kany, has fallen in love with her    More >

Caught in the Storm [a novel]

Voices of Change: Short Stories by Saudi Arabian Women Writers

edited and translated by Abubaker Bagader, Ava M. Heinrichsdorff, and Deborah S. Akers

Poignant and thought-provoking, this anthology offers a representative selection from the past three decades of works by the best-known women writers in Saudi Arabia. The authors’ stories of their patriarchal society afford rare insight into the traditional and changing roles, relationships, and expectations of modern Saudi women. The editors provide an introductory essay on modern Saudi    More >

Voices of Change: Short Stories by Saudi Arabian Women Writers

The Novels of Alex La Guma: The Representation of a Political Conflict

Kathleen Balutansky

In this fresh look at the troubled, passionate work of an important South African writer and social critic, Balutansky explores Alex La Guma’s five novels in all their dimensions. Balutansky notes La Guma’s belief that, in order to lead a fulfilling existence, an individual must go beyond introspection and adopt a life that is organized around unity, caring, and sharing. She is    More >

Islam and the West African Novel: The Politics of Representation

Ahmed Sheikh Bangura

Ahmed Bangura argues that a deeply ingrained pattern of prejudice toward Islam in European-language writing on Africa has led to serious misreadings of many West African novels. Extending Edward Said's study of the orientalist tradition in Western scholarship, Bangura traces the origins of contemporary misunderstandings of African Islam to the discourse of colonial literature. Western critics and    More >

Six Days [a novel]

Halim Barakat, translated by Bassam Frangieh and Scott McGehee

Prophetically named for a real war yet to come, Six Days depicts the struggle of a fictional city under siege. Barakat tells the story of shy lovers, friends, increasing fear and anger, and finally the terror of war. The people of Dayr Albahr are confronted with an ultimatum: surrender or be destroyed. They choose to resist, knowing that they face inevitable defeat, but sustained by a    More >

Days of Dust [a novel]

Halim Barakat, translated by Trevor Le Gassickwith an introduction by Edward Said

Focusing on the interaction of finely portrayed characters from all elements of society, Days of Dust depicts the existential drama of the Six Days War as it was experienced on a personal level. The novel provides a remarkable perspective for comprehending Palestinian uprootedness and a people’s unceasing struggle for a homeland. First published in Arabic in 1969. This edition includes    More >

Walcott’s Omeros: A Reader’s Guide

Don Barnard

Don Barnard's reader's guide plumbs the richness, subtlety, and power of Derek Walcott’s Omeros. Barnard adeptly lays out the major themes of the work, explains Walcott's geographical, historical, and autobiographical references, and explores his use of symbolism. He also highlights the qualities that make Omeros a master class in the use of form, rhythm, and rhyme and    More >

Walcott’s Omeros: A Reader’s Guide

The Little Black Fish and Other Modern Persian Stories, 2nd Edition

Samad Behrangi, translated by Mary Hegland and Eric Hooglund

Behrangi offers five children’s stories that are notable for their realism and social significance. In keeping with his desire to combat ignorance and bridge the cultural gap between the rural poor and wealthy city dwellers and land owners, his stories do not shield children from knowledge about the pain and cruelty of life. Rather, they pay homage to the lives of the poor, who despite their    More >

Shattered Vision [a novel]

Rabah Belamri, translated by Hugh A. Harter

The violence of war leads to the euphoria of Algeria's newly won independence from France—and then quickly deteriorates into a harsh and cynical reality in this brutal yet lyrical autobiographical novel. Shattered Vision (first published in France as Le regard blesse) was awarded the Prix France Culture in 1987.    More >

Shattered Vision [a novel]

Bibliography of Women Writers from the Caribbean: 1831–1986

Brenda F. Berrian and Aart Broek, editors

This exhaustive bibliography includes creative works by Dutch-, English-, French-, and Spanish-speaking women writers from the Caribbean. The entries are grouped by language region, and within region by genre. There is also an extensive author index.    More >

Weavers of the Songs

edited and translated by Mishael Maswari Caspi and Julia Ann Blessing

A collection of songs sung by Arab women, compiled by Caspi during field research in the West Bank and Israel. The songs, in English translation, are divided into three sections: bridal songs, lullabies, and lamentations. The work also includes a general introduction and a bibliography.    More >

The Repudiation [a novel]

Rachid Boudjedra, translated by Golda Lambrova, with an introduction by Heidi Abdel Jaouod

In this turbulent novel of shame, violence, and hypocritical morality, the adolescent son of a repudiated mother grows up in a hostile, erotic, bourgeois world, where he must fight for his own soul. Using violence against violence, the young hero seeks to realize his better nature by overcoming the powers of hedonism, religious conformity, and tribalism. First published in French in 1969.    More >

The Repudiation [a novel]

Critical Perspectives on Lusophone Literature from Africa

Donald Burness, editor

The struggle for liberation from colonial rule in lusophone Africa, which culminated in the creation of several independent nations, has produced a vigorous body of works that are innovative in both theme and language. This collection of critical essays, accompanied by more than 30 illustrations and photographs, covers a range of literary forms (both oral and written) and also discusses the    More >

On the Shoulder of Marti

Donald Burness

This collection of fiction and poetry, written by members of the military forces sent by Castro to help defeat the South Africa-backed regime in Angola, reflects the realities of painful years in Africa. The material is laced together by Burness’ narrative of past and present wars and rebellions.    More >

Fire: Six Writers from Angola, Mozambique and Cape Verde

Donald Burness

Because of, and at times in spite of, the distinct quality of Portuguese colonial policy, an original and vibrant lusophone literature exists today in Africa. Burness introduces the too-little- known work of Angola’s Luandino Viera, Agostinho Neto, Geraldo Bessa Victor, and Mario Antonio, Cape Verde’s Baltasar Lopes, and Mozambique’s Luis Bernardo Honwana.    More >

The Whistling Bird: Women Writers of the Caribbean

Elaine Campbell and Pierrette Frickey, editors

The Whistling Bird celebrates what were until recently the little-heard voices of women writers from the Caribbean. The anthology includes short stories, poetry, drama, and excerpts from novels—all rich, melodic works written with clarity and conviction.    More >

The Whistling Bird: Women Writers of the Caribbean

Mother Comes of Age [a novel]

Driss Chraibi, translated by Hugh A. Harter

Setting his novel during World War II, Chraïbi opens the door on the protected and well-to- do world of an Arab woman whose role in society is restricted to that of wife and mother. At the urging of her two sons, she seeks knowledge of the larger world with all its political, economic, and social realities. Soon, she begins to develop and express her own opinions about the ongoing World War    More >

Mother Comes of Age [a novel]

The Butts [a novel]

Driss Chraibi, translated by Hugh A. Harter

The dehumanization of the Arabs who emigrated to "Mother France" is the subject of Chraïbi’s second novel, echoing Simple Past. This time, however, the focus is more on the values and customs of the West, whose promises to the Islamic world appear as a facade for violence and exploitation. The story unfolds in the mind of Yalaan Waldik, an "Arabo" who aspires to    More >

Flutes of Death [a novel]

Driss Chraibi, translated by Robin A. Roosevelt

The first book in a trilogy that continues with Mother Spring and Birth at Dawn, this naturalistic allegory is about two Arabic-speaking police officers who set out in the Atlas Mountains in search of a revolutionary. Once in this mysterious region, the officers, with their postcolonial, Westernized manners, are challenged by the ferociously suspicious and independent-minded Berber    More >

Mother Spring [a novel]

Driss Chraibi, translated by Hugh A. Harter

Beginning with an epilogue set in the present, this novel quickly moves back to the time of the generation after Muhammad—a time when North Africa, the home of the Berber peoples, was overrun by Arab armies. With strong characters and a compelling sense of place, Chraïbi demonstrates how the Berbers tried to maintain their cultural identity in the face of the overwhelmingly rapid and    More >

Birth at Dawn [a novel]

Driss Chraibi, translated by Ann Woollcombe

The final volume in a trilogy that includes The Flutes of Death and Mother Spring, Birth at Dawn extends to the eighth century the story of the arrival of Islam in Morocco and Algeria. First published in French in 1986.    More >

Inspector Ali [a novel]

Driss Chraibi, translated by Lara McGlashan

After many years abroad, Brahim, the author of stories about a detective (alter-ego) named Ali, returns to Morocco with his pregnant Scottish wife and two sons. Soon to join them are his in-laws, complete with golf clubs and nervous expectations about a mysterious land. In a warm, satirical novel about the misunderstanding between two worlds, Chraïbi pokes fun at both the native Morocco of    More >

Inspector Ali [a novel]

Muhammad [a novel]

Driss Chraibi, translated by Nadia Benabid

It is the 26th day of Ramadan in the year 610, and a handsome man named Muhammad is meditating in a cave on Mount Hira. Fear grips him as he tries to sort out the visions and voices washing over him; and terrified that he is possessed, he leaves the cave to return to Mecca. The day that will transform Muhammad’s life—and change the world—has begun. That day becomes a fluid    More >

Muhammad [a novel]

Heremakhonon [a novel]

Maryse Condé, translated by Richard Philcox

Veronica Mercier, a sophisticated Caribbean woman teaching and living in Paris, journeys to West Africa in pursuit of her "identity." There, she becomes involved with a prominent political figure—and must find her way among the often misleading guises of ambition, idealism, and violence. Conveying a mosaic of feelings (from childhood and adolescence in Guadeloupe, university days    More >

Heremakhonon [a novel]

The City Where No One Dies [a novel]

Bernard Dadie, translated by Janis A. Mayes

In this witty and ironic reversal of the typical colonial travelogue, Dadié recounts the journey of a bemused African traveler who settles in Rome, continuing his inquiries into the fundamental nature of humankind. Part conqueror, part pilgrim, part worshipper, and part critic, the protagonist compares Roman and African customs, traditions, history, and above all,    More >

The City Where No One Dies [a novel]

Dele's Child [a novel]

O.R. Dathorne

Guyana-born poet-novelist Dathorne’s powerful work, set against the background of a revolution, both political and spiritual, is a compelling account of the search for ancestry and legacy. The reader learns about the past, present, and future of the chief protagonists—Dele, the saintly whore; Pietro, the impotent medical practitioner; Ianty, the corrupt politician; and Stephan, who    More >

Wind Driven Reed & Other Poems

Fouzi El-Asmar, translated by G. Kanazeh and Uri Davis

Poems of home and exile by Fouzi El-Asmar, a Palestinian poet and journalist. Most selections are presented in dual English/Arabic text.    More >

Last Glass of Tea and Other Stories

Mohamed El-Bisatie, edited and translated by Denys Johnson-Davies

A vivid portrait of the lives of the Egyptian poor, particularly in the Nile Delta region, emerges in this collection of 24 short stories. El-Bisatie offers glimpses of the daily struggles and activities of old men, young women, prisoners, war widows, and everyone in between. Masterfully crafted, his stories cultivate in the reader compassion, hatred, understanding, and suspense.    More >

Last Glass of Tea and Other Stories

The Palestinian Wedding: A Bilingual Anthology of Contemporary Palestinian Resistance Poetry

edited and translated by A.M. Elmessiri, illustrated by Kamal Boullata

The poems in this powerful bilingual collection range from the rhetorical lyricism of Tawfiq Zayyad to the complex, cosmic imagery of Walid al-Halis, from the romantic idiom of Salma al-Jayyusi to the edgy, convoluted style of Tawfiq Sayigh, all evoking Palestine, the never-forgotten homeland. The rich variety of the work is explored in Abdelwahab Elmessiri's extensive introduction and    More >

The Palestinian Wedding: A Bilingual Anthology of Contemporary Palestinian Resistance Poetry

Where She Came From: A Daughter’s Search for Her Mother’s History

Helen Epstein

After the death of her mother, author and journalist Helen Epstein set out to uncover her mother's past and to learn more about her grandmother and great-grandmother, victims of the Holocaust. The result is this compelling biography, both a chronicle of three generations of women and a social history of Czechoslovakia's Jews.    More >

Where She Came From: A Daughter’s Search for Her Mother’s History

Critical Perspectives on Jean Rhys

Pierrette M. Frickey, editor

Rhys, acclaimed author of Wide Sargasso Sea, Quartet, and other novels treating the alienation of a woman from the Caribbean living in European settings, has been a focus of interest both as a feminist writer and in the context of Caribbean literature. She was honored with the W. H. Smith Award in 1967 and the Council of Great Britain Award for Writers in 1979.    More >

Achebe, Head, Marechera: On Power and Change in Africa

Annie Gagiano

Concentrating on issues of power and change, Annie Gagiano's close reading of literary texts by Chinua Achebe, Bessie Head, and Dambudzo Marechera teases out each author's view of how colonialism affected Africa, the contribution of Africans to their own malaise, and above all, the creative, progressive, pragmatic role of many Africans during the colonial and postcolonial periods. Gagiano    More >

The Novel and Contemporary Experience in A frica

Shatto Arthur Gakwandi

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The Man Who Lost His Shadow [a novel]

Fathy Ghanem, translated by Desmond Stewart

The life of a young, ambitious Cairo journalist as seen through the eyes of the two women who love him and the two colleagues who befriend him, only to be betrayed. First published in Arabic.     More >

Critical Perspectives on Wole Soyinka

James Gibbs, editor

Distinguished scholars analyze the plays, poetry, and prose of Soyinka, winner of the Nobel Prize for literature in 1986. Introductory essays trace Soyinka’s career and place his work in the general context of African literature; the book also includes a definitive bibliography of his work and a chronology of his publications.    More >

Monsieur Toussaint: A Play

Edouard Glissant, translated by J. Michael Dash and Edouard Glissant

Edouard Glissant's Monsieur Toussaint tells the tragic story of Toussaint L'Ouverture, the charismatic leader of the revolution—the only successful slave revolt in history—that led to Haiti's independence more than two hundred years ago.   Translated by J. Michael Dash in collaboration with the author, this new edition captures the striking essence of the original    More >

Monsieur Toussaint: A Play

Critical Perspectives on Derek Walcott

Robert D. Hamner, editor

Derek Walcott, winner of the 1992 Nobel Prize for literature, has risen from obscure colonial origins to lay claim to a rich cultural heritage. The progeny of Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas come together in his work as they populate his native Caribbean islands; his poetry and plays record their struggles to overcome the ironies of their lives, to establish their authentic "new    More >

Joseph Conrad: Third World Perspectives

Robert D. Hamner, editor

Issues of racial discrimination, imperialist exploitation, and accuracy of observation have long interested Conrad’s critics. As a European writing about imperialism in exotic lands, Conrad offered a vivid, but subjective account of the confrontations between the cultures and peoples of East and West. Though some in Africa have condemned his novels as racist, the books have been used as    More >

Critical Perspectives on V.S. Naipaul

Robert D. Hamner, editor

This collection combines articles by Naipaul himself, reflecting his developing ideas from 1958 through the mid-1970s, with fourteen perceptive essays representing his reception among critics.    More >

Naked in Exile: Khalil Hawi's The Threshing Floors of Hunger

Khalil Hawi, translated and with extensive interpretive material by Adnan Haydarand Michael Beard

Assembled in this volume are the Arabic and English texts of the three long poems that make up Hawi's Bayadir al-ju [The Threshing Floors of Hunger], The Cave, The Genie of the Beach, and Plurals in Singular Form: The Transformations of Lazarus 1962. The translators provide detailed essays that explain each poem and the specific problems encountered in translating it.    More >

Doguicimi [a novel]

Paul Hazoume, translated by Richard Bjornson

Although he was a staunch supporter of French colonialism, Paul Hazoumé in his realistic, sweeping narrative captures the customs and traditions—the soul—of Dahomey. This historical novel, set in the first half of the nineteenth century, depicts a proud and powerful nation at a turning point in its long pattern of wars, slave trade, and human sacrifices—practices that, in    More >

A Woman [a novel]

Peter Härtling, translated by Joachim Neugroschel

The protagonist, Katharina Wüllner—like many other women who were born shortly after the turn of the century—married just after the First World War and then had to send her husband and sons to fight in World War II. Her life spans the regimes of Kaiser Wilhelm II, the Weimar Republic, Hitler's Reich, the Allied Occupation, and finally the Federal Republic. Her story is in many    More >

A Woman [a novel]

Schubert [a novel]

Peter Härtling, translated by Rosemary Smith

Brilliant, soulful, poor, and doomed to a short life, Franz Peter Schubert (1797-1828) in many ways embodied the Romantic era in which he lived. In this vibrant biographical novel, Peter Härtling brings the composer to life as a man of exquisite sensitivity, passionate extremes, and a profound sense of rootlessness much like the famous wanderers of his musical creations. The deftly    More >

Schubert [a novel]

Our Sun Will Rise

Amelia Blossom House, with drawings by Selma Waldman

A collection of forty-two poems that depict the pain and pathos, the political and personal struggles that marked South Africa during apartheid. House is acutely sensitive to the sometimes subtle, sometimes explosive tensions of her homeland—and to the hope that must accompany any movement toward liberation. Eighteen full-page drawings by Selma Waldman are presented as visual responses to    More >

The Seventh Door and Other Stories

Intizar Husain, editor; with an introduction by Muhammad Umar Memon

These powerful stories were written between 1947, when Pakistan was created, and 1971, when it was fragmented by the creation of Bangladesh as an independent nation. Steeped in an unmistakable Shi’ite ambiance, they also draw freely on memoirs and memories, dreams and visions, Middle Eastern oral traditions, and Hindu and Buddhist mythology.    More >

Tawfiq al-Hakim: A Reader's Guide

William Maynard Hutchins

Tawfiq al-Hakim (1898-1987) dedicated much of his long life to a fruitful attempt to advance the fortunes of twentieth century Arabic literature by writing it. This guide to his work provides paths for readers through his multiple literary worlds. Chapters on his personal history, his novels, plays, short stories, and essays, his Islamic feminism, and his theology are enhanced by a discussion of    More >

Tawfiq al-Hakim: A Reader's Guide

The Sinners [a novel]

Yusuf Idris, translated by Kristin Peterson-Ishaq

A woman abandons her newborn baby in a ditch. Soon discovered, the corpse arouses in the local peasants an intense desire to bring the killer to justice—and gives them the excuse to pry into the lives of the entire community. The primary suspects are a group of migrant workers, and the question of their guilt or innocence soon reveals other kinds of truths. The Sinners is an evocative    More >

The Sinners [a novel]

The Cheapest Nights

Yusuf Idris, translated by Wadida Wassef

Idris developed a form of expression new to Arabic literary tradition, deliberately distinguishing between the colloquial Arabic spoken by his characters and the classical form that he used as narrator. This innovation at first raised an outcry among Arab critics, who disparaged his deviation from tradition; eventually, however, his work came to be valued as a purely indigenous product and a stark    More >

The Cheapest Nights

The Ship [a novel]

Jabra I. Jabra, translated and introduced by Adnan Haydar and Roger Allen

Jabra’s highly acclaimed novel is a masterful exploration of the post-1948 Arab world, with its frustrations, yearnings for homeland, and struggle for survival. As his characters interact on a ship sailing from Beirut to Europe, Jabra exposes them to the elements of spiritual and physical displacement. Some survive; others do not.    More >

Hunters in a Narrow Street [a novel]

Jabra I. Jabra, with an introduction by Roger Allen

Jameel Farran, a Christian Arab, is forced to flee his destroyed Jerusalem in 1948. Teaching at Baghdad University, he falls in love with a beautiful Muslim girl, Sulafa, but their turbulent affair meets almost insurmountable obstacles of tradition and circumstance. This is a story of multiple conflicts—between Arab and Jew, desert and city, dictatorship and futile liberal effort, Eastern    More >

Hunters in a Narrow Street [a novel]

Egyptian Short Stories

edited and translated by Denys Johnson-Davies

Seventeen short stories by such well-known writers as Abdullah, Idris, Mahfouz, Taher, Ibrahim, Sharouni, Fahmy, Sibai, and    More >

Egyptian Short Stories

Arabian Love Poems, new edition

Nizar Kabbani, translated by Bassam K. Frangieh and Clementina R.Brown

Nizar Kabbani’s poetry has been described as "more powerful than all the Arab regimes put together" (Lebanese Daily Star). Reflecting on his death in 1998, Sulhi Al-Wadi wrote (in Tishreen), "Qabbani is like water, bread, and the sun in every Arab heart and house. In his poetry the harmony of the heart, and in his blood the melody of love". Arabian Love Poems is the first    More >

Arabian Love Poems, new edition

The Rienner Anthology of African Literature

Anthonia C. Kalu, editor

ForeWord Magazine's Reference Book of the Year, 2007! Ranging from ancient cultures to the present century, from Africa's rich oral traditions to its contemporary fiction, poetry, and drama, this long-awaited comprehensive anthology reflects the enduring themes of African literature.   The selections, drawn from the length and breadth of the continent, reveal the richness of    More >

The Rienner Anthology of African Literature

Reflections: An Anthology of New Work by African Women Poets

Anthonia C. Kalu, Juliana Makuchi Nfah-Abbenyi, and Omofolabo Ajayi-Soyinka, editors

This anthology of never-before-published poems showcases a new generation of African women poets, some familiar, some just beginning their literary careers. Their rich voices belie popular stereotypes, reflecting the diversity and dynamism of their environment. As they range across topics encompassing family and personal relationships, politics, war, and the ravages of famine and disease, they    More >

Reflections: An Anthology of New Work by African Women Poets

Palestine's Children: Returning to Haifa and Other Stories

Ghassan Kanafani, translated by Barbara Harlow and Karen E. Riley

"Politics and the novel," Ghassan Kanafani once said, "are an indivisible case." Fadl al-Naqib reflected that Kanafani "wrote the Palestinian story, then he was written by it." His narratives offer entry into the Palestinian experience of the conflict that has anguished the people of the Middle East for more than a century. In Palestine's Children, each story    More >

Palestine's Children: Returning to Haifa and Other Stories

Men in the Sun and Other Palestinian Stories (new edition)

Ghassan Kanafani, translated by Hilary Kilpatrick

This collection of important stories by novelist, journalist, teacher, and Palestinian activist Ghassan Kanafani includes the stunning novella Men in the Sun (1962), the basis of the film The Deceived. Also in the volume are "The Land of Sad Oranges" (1958), "'If You Were a Horse . . .'" (1961), "A Hand in the Grave" (1962), "The Falcon" (1961),    More >

Men in the Sun and Other Palestinian Stories (new edition)

A Feast in the Mirror: Stories by Contemporary Iranian Women

Mohammad Mehdi Khorrami and Shouleh Vatanabadi, editors

In the present golden era of Iranian fiction, women writers—contrary to what many in the West perceive—are making a powerful contribution to the literary scene. Reflecting this, A Feast in the Mirror captures the diverse voices of contemporary Iranian women, offering glimpses into their lives and into the labyrinths of Iranian society today. Moving from the framework of their own    More >

A Feast in the Mirror: Stories by Contemporary Iranian Women

Goodbye, Evil Eye: Stories

Gloria DeVidas Kirchheimer

National Jewish Book Awards Finalist! Humorous and endearing, while dealing with complex issues, the stories in Goodbye, Evil Eye reflect the tensions between Sephardic Jews and contemporary urban life in the United States. The characters—with their superstitions, myths, and contradictions, the still-palpable heritage of the Inquisition and the expulsion of the Jews from Spain—fight    More >

Goodbye, Evil Eye: Stories

Case Histories [a novel]

Alexander Kluge, translated by Leila Vennewitz

This book is a powerful introduction to the work of a German writer who possesses both the imaginative vigor of Günter Grass and the humanistic insight of Heinrich Böll. First publisehd in Germany in 1962 under the title Lebensläufe, Case Histories is a collection of eleven stories that recount the lives of various men and women who have somehow lost contact with their humanity and,    More >

Case Histories [a novel]

Pigeons on the Grass

Wolfgang Koeppen, translated by David Ward

Here is an English translation of a post-war German classic. The events of the novel take place during the course of a single day in an unnamed city in occupied Germany where the endless drone of allied planes overhead increases the already heightened tension. Throughout this powerful narrative, the characters' experiences ultimately reveal how and at what cost Germans in the 1950s, by failing    More >

Pigeons on the Grass

A Jewish Mother From Berlin [a novel] and Susanna [a novella]

Gertrud Kolmar, translated from the German by Brigitte M. Goldstein

In these two extraordinary works, published posthumously, Gertrude Kolmar's elegiac prose transports us into her characters' rich inner worlds even as it depicts the cold material realities of 1920s Berlin. In A Jewish Mother from Berlin, Martha Jadassohn's seemingly conventional life descends into chaos after the brutal rape of her five-year-old daughter. The ethereally beautiful    More >

A Jewish Mother From Berlin [a novel] and Susanna [a novella]

The Suns of Independence

Ahmadou Kourouma

A masterpiece of modern African literature, The Suns of Independence brilliantly captures the struggles, desires, and dreams of people in a west African country as they live through the tumultuous days of postcolonial independence.    More >

The Suns of Independence

Under a Cruel Star: A Life in Prague, 1941-1968

Heda Margolius Kovály, translated by Franci Epstein and Helen Epstein with the author

Heda Margolius Kovály (1919–2010) endured both the Nazi death camp at Auschwitz and the brutality of Czechoslovakia's postwar Stalinist government. Her husband, after surviving Dachau and Auschwitz and becoming Czechoslovakia's deputy minister of foreign trade, was convicted of conspiracy in the infamous 1952 Slansky trial and then executed. Her clear-eyed memoir of her life    More >

Under a Cruel Star: A Life in Prague, 1941-1968

The Memory of Stones [a novel]

Mandla Langa

Ngoza, in KwaZulu-Natal—South Africa's most turbulent province—is transformed when clan leader Baba Joshua dies and his headstrong daughter tackles the age-old shibboleths held by traditionalists and gangsters alike. The reluctant heroine of this novel, Zodwa, finds support from unlikely quarters. A disenchanted ex-ANC guerrilla and a dyed-in-the-wool white supremacist join forces    More >

Pears from the Willow Tree [a novel]

Violet Dias Lannoy, edited by C.L. Innes, with an introduction by Richard Lannoy and an afterword by Peter Nazareth

Seb, the protagonist of this Goan-Indian novel, is a member of the Indian “lost generation” caught between cultures, religions, and epochs. Struggling against the Western-style materialism and spiritual corruption he sees everywhere in the postimperial era, he becomes a teacher at a Gandhian-inspired school in the interior. There, both he and his “slow” students embark on a    More >

Critical Perspectives on Naguib Mahfouz

Trevor Le Gassick, editor

Eleven essays by Western and Middle Eastern scholars evaluate the work of Naguib Mahfouz, arguably Egypt's greatest novelist, and the winner of the 1988 Nobel Prize for Literature. The first such comprehensive, critical treatment in English, the book considers Mahfouz's short stories and screenplays, as well as his novels. The contributors pay particular attention to the sociocultural    More >

Critical Perspectives on Amos Tutuola

edited by Bernth Lindfors

Tutuola, Nigeria’s first novelist to write in English, is one of the most controversial of African authors. His six books have drawn reactions ranging from delirious enthusiasm to amused indifference to undisguised contempt. At any given time, his work might be reviled at home and respected abroad—or vice versa. His writing, however, does not seem much affected by the controversies,    More >

Women's Voice in Latin American Literature

Naomi Lindstrom

Women’s Voice is a detailed study of Clarice Lispector’s Laços de família, Rosario Castellanos’s Oficio de tinieblas, Marta Lynch’s La señora Ordóñez, and Silvina Bullrich’s Mañana digo basta. In deciding to focus on these, Lindstrom chose, from a wealth of literature, the authors that she felt not only express women’s    More >

Folktales from the Gambia: Wolof Fictional Narratives

edited and translated by Emil Magel

These translations of 45 Wolof folktales are remarkable for the way they capture the poignancy, humor, and meaning of their original, oral form. Organized according to their thematic patterns, the stories reveal much about the Wolof people’s relationship with their environment, their beliefs about causality, and their social values, morality, and customs. Including a general introduction and    More >

The Contagion of Matter

Valerio Magrelli, translated by Anthony Molino

His works having already been translated the world over into as many as six different languages from their original Italian, Valerio Magrelli is one of the most innovative and exciting poets writing today. Hailed by figures as diverse as Octavio Paz and Dana Gioia, Magrelli is widely regarded as the foremost Italian poet of his generation. This latest collection of his poetry, translated into    More >

The Contagion of Matter

Fountain and Tomb [a novel]

Naguib Mahfouz, translated by Soad Sobhi, Essam Fattouh, and James Kenneson

"I enjoy playing in the small square between the archway and the takiya [monastery] where the Sufis live. Like all the other children, I admire the mulberry trees in the takiya garden, the only bit of green in the whole neighborhood. Our tender hearts yearn for their dark berries. But it stands like a fortress, this takiya, circled by its garden wall. Its stern gate is broken and always, like    More >

Fountain and Tomb [a novel]

Jose Martí: Major Poems [Bilingual Edition]

Jose Martí, edited and with an introduction by Philip S. Foner and translated by Elinor Randall

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Jose Martí: Major Poems [Bilingual Edition]

Ken Saro-Wiwa: Writer and Political Activist

Craig McLuckie and Aubrey McPhail, editors

The shocking execution of Ken Saro-Wiwa at the hands of the Nigerian government in 1995 stirred new interest in the many facets of his life—as novelist and short story writer, radio and television personality, publisher and entrepreneur, political and environmental activist. This interdisciplinary collection critically assesses Saro-Wiwa’s exceptional life and work from a range of    More >

Critical Perspectives on Dennis Brutus

Craig W. McLuckie and Patrick J. Colbert, editors

Poet, activist, teacher, and scholar, Dennis Brutus is one of the foremost names in African literature—as a creative force, a cultural influence, and a personality. Exploring Brutus's life and writings, this collection opens with a biographical introduction to his "art and activism," covering his childhood, his university days, his arrest and imprisonment in 1964–1965, his    More >

The Tale of the Old Fisherman: Contemporary Urdu Short Stories

edited and with an introduction by Muhammad Umar Memon

These twelve stories set in modern Pakistan capture the rich Urdu literary tradition, telling close, personal tales of family relationships, love, spirituality, dreams, and the interactions between members of different races and religions. A discussion of contemporary Urdu literature introduces the volume. The authors included in the collection are Zamiruddin Ahmad, Khalida Asghar, Masud Ashar,    More >

The Origins of Modern Arabic Fiction, 2nd Edition

Matti Moosa

The first edition of this book, completed in 1970, was hailed as a major contribution to scholarship on the development of Arabic fiction in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In this revised and greatly expanded second edition, Matti Moosa has added five entirely new chapters—one on the popular dialogues of Abd Allah Nadim, and four devoted to twentieth century fiction    More >

Maghrebian Mosaic: A Literature in Transition

Mildred Mortimer, editor

Albert Memmi published the first anthology of francophone Maghrebian literature, he expressed his unhappy belief that francophone writing would quickly be eclipsed by Arabic. To the contrary, this volume demonstrates that the francophone writing of North Africa remains vibrant and prolific. Two distinct periods are evident in contemporary Maghrebian letters, producing the anticolonial works    More >

Maghrebian Mosaic: A Literature in Transition

Chaminuka: Prophet of Zimbabwe [a novel]

Solomon M. Mutswairo

The late Solomon Mutswairo was one of southern Africa's most prominent contemporary writers. Here, he gives us a historical novel about Zimbabwe’s famed nineteenth-century prophet, Chaminuka, a man who sacrificed his life for the cause of peace. Mutswairo tells a tragic tale about deception and the dislocation caused by the "divide and conquer" strategies of colonialism. But    More >

Attar of Roses and Other Stories of Pakistan

Tahira Naqvi

"Not sure if he were imagining it or if it were indeed real, he inhaled a familiar scent, rose attar, the fragrance that had consumed him in his sleeping and waking hours.... she was there! He spotted and recognized the black sandals, saw the hands, pale and lovely, the black glass bangles catching the light of the sun like flames leaping out in the darkness."—Excerpt from    More >

Attar of Roses and Other Stories of Pakistan

The Coloured Bangles & Other Short Stories

Saloni Narang

Narang describes India as a land that lives simultaneously in several centuries, “accepting much and rejecting nothing.” It is a place of contrasts and contradictions, “where volatile emotions see-saw against a phlegmatic acceptance of the writ of fate.” Her stories, set in northern India—sometimes in the westernized homes of the educated elite, sometimes in the mud    More >

Critical Perspectives on Sam Selvon

Susheila Nasta, editor

This groundbreaking study of prolific Trinidadian writer Sam Selvon includes background essays, interviews with Selvon, and critical assessments of his ten novels and collected short stories. An extensive bibliography and notes on the contributors are included. In addition to Sam Selvon, the contributors to the work include Whitney Balliett, Harold Barratt, Edward Baugh, Frank Birbalsingh, E.K.    More >

Apples of Gold in Filigrees of Silver: Jewish Writing in the Eye of the Spanish Inquisition

Colbert I. Nepaulsingh

During the Spanish Inquisition, daring individuals defied and thwarted persecution by writing works in which hidden meanings were apparent only to Jews or fellow conversos, the descendants of Jewish converts to Christianity. Colbert Nepaulsingh analyzes three seminal, sixteenth-century novels as converso works—Lazarillo, a prototype of the picaresque novel; El Abencerraje, of the Moorish    More >

Apples of Gold in Filigrees of Silver: Jewish Writing in the Eye of the Spanish Inquisition

Turkish Short Stories from Four Decades

Aziz Nesin, translated and introduced by Louis Mitler

These twenty stories show the broad range of iconoclast, fabulist, realist, satirist, avant- gardist Aziz Nesin (1915-1995), long considered a major voice in contemporary Turkish fiction. Like many Turkish writers, Nesin was born into poverty, saw his work censured, and suffered imprisonment; as these stories demonstrate, however, his voice is very much his own, rich with insights into the social    More >

Turkish Short Stories from Four Decades

Critical Perspectives on Christopher Okigbo

Donatus Ibe Nwoga, editor

A collection of essays and reviews, both favorable and negative, about the charismatic and popular Igbo poet who, at the age of 35, was killed by the advancing Nigerian army during the war of Biafran secession. The book begins with a memorial essay by Okigbo’s good friend Chinua Achebe. Other contributors examine the rich imagery that Okigbo drew from nature, history, and politics,    More >

The New African Poetry: An Anthology

Tanure Ojaide and Tijan M. Sallah, editors

This anthology presents the voices of a new generation of African poets, drawn from across the continent and representing a wide range of themes, styles, and ideologies. These contemporary voices have been shaped in the realities of postcolonial Africa from the mid-1970s to the present. In contrast to the preceding generation—forged in the years of nationalist movements and    More >

The New African Poetry: An Anthology

Road to Europe [ a novel]

Ferdinand Oyono, translated by Richard Bjornson

Oyono’s third novel is the bittersweet, first-person story of Aki Barnabas, a young Cameroonian scholar who seeks to become “someone” by using the rules of the colonial system to his personal advantage. Failing in his nearly ten-year effort to win a scholarship to Paris, sacrificing his very self in a futile quest for prestige, Barnabas becomes lost at home and unwanted abroad.    More >

Caribbean Passages: A Critical Perspective on New Fiction from the West Indies

Richard F. Patteson

Offering a critical perspective on new fiction from the West Indies, Patteson concentrates on five writers from diverse backgrounds and with differing perspectives and artistic strategies, who nevertheless share a commitment to an imaginative repossession of Caribbean life and consciousness. The writers discussed are Olive Senior (Jamaica), who combines devices of oral narratives and    More >

A Dance of Masks: Senghor, Achebe, and Soyinka

Jonathan A. Peters

Peters searches for themes about African self-identity by exploring images of the mask in the poetry of Senghor, the fiction of Achebe, and the drama of Soyinka. His focus is not on the mask as a physical object, but as a concept—a dynamic interplay that involves both the mask and its wearer. Within this interplay, he finds important insights about Africanness as defined by three of the    More >

Writing the Book of Esther [a novel]

Henri Roczymow, translated from the French by Dori Katz

Mathieu, the narrator of this novel, is compelled by his older sister's suicide to confront the effects of his family's tragic past. Born after the war, Mathieu is left to grapple with recovering his sister's memories—which he had resolutely tried to deny—and with it the meaning of his own identity, family origins, and historical predicament. As neither victim, survivor,    More >

Writing the Book of Esther [a novel]

The Distant Friend [a novel]

Claude Roy, translated by Hugh A. Harter, with an introduction by Jack Kolbert

Nothing ever happens to Etienne. Born into a provincial French family, he grows up in the shadow of his ambitious successful brother. His personality passive, his life uneventful, he is resigned to his own inferiority—-until he meets Stefan. German, Jewish, outgoing, and cosmopolitan, Stefan Stein could hardly be more unlike Etienne. Yet, when the two young teenagers first meet, they form a    More >

The Distant Friend [a novel]

Girl with Two Landscapes: The Wartime Diary of Lena Jedwab, 1941-1945

Lena Jedwab Rozenberg, translated by Solon Beinfeld, with a foreword by Irena Klepfisz, and an introduction by Jan T. Gross

In June 1941, sixteen-year-old Lena Jedwab left her home in Poland and arrived at summer camp in Russia—just as Germany invaded the Soviet Union. Stranded in a children's home in Russia, she began to keep a diary, eloquently chronicling her experiences as she confronted the turmoil and terror of war, the unknown fate of her family (killed by the Nazis at Treblinka), and her own    More >

Girl with Two Landscapes: The Wartime Diary of Lena Jedwab, 1941-1945

Season of Migration to the North [a novel]

Tayeb Salih, translated by Denys Johnson-Davies

Salih's shocking and beautiful novel reveals much about the people on each side of a cultural divide. A brilliant Sudanese student takes his mix of anger and obsession with the West to London, where he has affairs with women who are similarly obsessed with the mysterious East. Life, ecstasy, and death share the same moment in time. First published in Arabic in 1969.    More >

Season of Migration to the North [a novel]

Dreams of Dusty Roads: New Poems

Tijan M. Sallah

One of the most important literary voices to emerge from The Gambia for several decades, Sallah writes nostalgically about his African roots. This, his third collection, includes elegant, often melodic poems about love, prayer, fate, homesickness, and the contrasts between different places and cultures.    More >

Dreams of Dusty Roads: New Poems

Daughters of Sarah: Anthology of Jewish Women Writing in French

Eva Martin Sartori and Madeleine Cottenet-Hage, editors

National Jewish Book Awards Finalist! The editors have gathered a treasure trove of excerpts (some translated into English for the first time) from a variety of genres—novels, short stories, letters, plays, poetry, autobiographies—to showcase the work of both well-known and less familiar French Jewish women writers from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. The collection    More >

Daughters of Sarah: Anthology of Jewish Women Writing in French

Moses Migrating [a novel] (new edition)

Sam Selvon, with an introduction by Susheila Nasta

It has been more than 25 years since Moses Aloetta became one of the “Lonely Londoners” in the novel of that name. Now—though an avowed Anglophile—he hankers for Trinidad, for sunshine, Carnival, and rum punch. With characteristic irony and delicacy of touch, Sam Selvon tells the story of Moses’s reencounter with his native land. This edition of the novel    More >

Moses Migrating [a novel] (new edition)

Housing Lark [a novel]

Sam Selvon

Battersby, the hero of Selvon’s fifth novel, is a West Indian exile in London who encounters both hardships and amusing situations in his search for adequate and reasonably priced shelter. In Housing Lark Selvon explores the plight of the West Indian in the “Mother Country,” and the exiles’ interactions with English women, the British in general, and each other. First    More >

Voices Revealed: Arab Women Novelists, 1898-2000

Bouthaina Shaaban

Spanning more than a century, this systematic study brings to the forefront a dazzling array of novels by Arab women writers. Bouthaina Shaaban's analysis ranges from the work of Zaynab Fawwaz, published at the end of the nineteenth century, to that of Sahar Khalifah and Najwa Barakat, published at the cusp of the twenty-first. The novels discussed reflect not only specifically Arab    More >

Voices Revealed: Arab Women Novelists, 1898-2000

Silence and Invisibility: A Study of the Literature of the Pacific, Australia, and New Zealand

Norman Simms

Simms explores the methodological and theoretical problems faced by creative writers in the Pacific, perceptively discussing not only the native author’s dilemma in expressing ideas and forms generally unfamiliar to Westerners, but also the problems that foreign critics and general readers face in evaluating works by Pacific authors. He considers, too, how a writer evolves in a culture where    More >

Writers from the South Pacific

Norman Simms

This ambitious work presents biographical entries for nearly 500 of the leading Oceanic writers, as well as references to approximately 2,000 authors and 10,000 novels, anthologies, memoirs, cultural studies, and literary journals. It includes an index organized by countries/regions.    More >

Central American Writers of West Indian Origin

Ian Smart

This is the first book-length analysis of the emerging literature written in Spanish by contemporary Central Americans whose grandparents came from the largely English-speaking islands of the Caribbean. Smart shows how the themes of language, religion, identity, exile, the plantation, mestizaje, and interracial love are explored in this literature to their fullest pan- Caribbean potential, and how    More >

Exile and Tradition: Studies in African and Caribbean Literature

Rowland Smith, editor

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Exile and Tradition: Studies in African and Caribbean Literature

Maiba: A Novel of Papua New Guinea

Russell Soaba

The only child of the last traditional chief of Makawana village, Maiba struggles to hold her people together in the face of the polarizing forces of convention and modernization. Soaba makes palpable the tensions that arise when rapid change confronts a society that has been stable for many centuries. We also follow his unlikely heroine’s journey as she overcomes the legacy of a neglected    More >

Maiba: A Novel of Papua New Guinea

Like a Tear in the Ocean, Volume 2: The Abyss

Manès Sperber, translated by Constantine Fitzgibbon

Sperber's great fiction trilogy spans the period from 1931 through the rise of Hitler and the struggles of international Communism to the early postwar era. It traces the lives of intellectuals, partisans, Communists, and ex-Communists during those turbulent, desperate, and heartbreaking years. This second novel in the series is one of brooding self-analysis and remorse, an account of some    More >

Like a Tear in the Ocean, Volume 2: The Abyss

The Unheeded Warning, 1918–1933 [a memoir]

Manès Sperber, translated from the German by Harry Zohn

The Unheeded Warning richly portrays the turbulent interwar period in Vienna and Berlin through the eyes of one of the century's foremost intellectuals and activists. Psychologist, novelist, essayist, and revolutionary, Manès Sperber begins his story in Vienna when he was thirteen years old and concludes the book—which is the second volume of his three-volume autobiography, All    More >

The Unheeded Warning, 1918–1933 [a memoir]

Until My Eyes Are Closed With Shards [a memoir]

Manès Sperber, translated from the German by Harry Zohn

Acclaimed as one of the most vivid and evocative autobiographies of the century, Manès Sperber’s trilogy All Our Yesterdays concludes in this final volume. Through the eyes of this eminent European intellectual and activist, we witness the years 1934–1984 including hostility between Croats and Serbs in Yugoslavia, the abortive workers' uprising in Vienna, and Stalin's    More >

Until My Eyes Are Closed With Shards [a memoir]

God's Angry Babies [a novel]

Ian G. Strachan

This coming-of-age novel by the accomplished Bahamian writer Ian G. Strachan traces the life of Tree Bodie as he grows up in the Yellow and White House and the nameless streets of Pompey Village, far (though not in distance) from the sanitized world of Santa Maria's luxury hotels. Against the backdrop of the internal struggles of a Caribbean island nation, Strachan tells the story of    More >

My Days in Mecca

Ahmad Suba'i, edited and translated by Deborah S. Akers and Abubaker A. Bagader

Ahmad Suba'i's autobiography is the story not only of an Arab boy growing up in Saudi Arabia at the turn of the twentieth century—to become a noted writer, educator, and social critic—but also of a place, Mecca, and of the world of the traditional quranic school of the time. Contextualizing the work, the editors have provided information about Suba'i's life and work,    More >

My Days in Mecca

The Golden Phoenix: Seven Contemporary Korean Short Stories

Suh Ji-moon, translator and editor

These seven stories, dramatic and thought-provoking, provide a compelling picture of Korean life in the 1940s–1990s. Family and community ties, respect for tradition, survival in the face of repeated national disasters and wrenching social upheaval—these are among the themes evoked in the collection. The narratives make palpable the lives and emotions of characters from many differing    More >

Paper Boats

Hilary Tham

This is the volume that first presented Hilary Tham’s unique voice to the world literary scene. Described vividly and compassionately, Tham’s colorful cast of characters includes a Cantonese grandfather who repaired ships under water, but now refuses to go into the sea; a strong-willed grandmother with bound feet but an unbounded mind; and a mother who arranges a marriage between her    More >

Men and Other Strange Myths: Poems and Art

Hilary Tham

Through birthright, travel, marriage, and work, Hilary Tham has experienced an extraordinary range of world cultures, all vibrantly reflected in her latest collection of poems. Tham’s insights and unusual juxtapositions tell of the meetings of strangers, friends, and lovers; the clashes of differing religions and cultures; and the eternal conflict and misunderstanding between men and women,    More >

Lane With No Name: Memoirs and Poems of a Malaysian-Chinese Girlhood

Hilary Tham

Hilary Tham's memoirs reveal the many images, cultures, myths, and memories out of which her poetry has emerged. Tham recalls a life of many textures: her Chinese ancestry, her family's life in Malaysia, her early education and conversion to Christianity, her university studies, marriage to a U.S. Peace Corps volunteer, and more. Amidst memories of her raffish father and inspired, overworked    More >

Lion Mountain [a novel]

Mustapha Tlili, translated by Linda Coverdale

As a young widow with two boys to raise, Horia El-Gharib struggled to reconcile tradition and change. She dared to take on a man's role in commerce and trade to protect the future of her sons—but now, all is at risk in the midst of the turmoil of the newly independent regime. Lion Mountain is the unforgettable story of a stubborn old woman, a one-legged Nubian war hero, and a    More >

Lion Mountain [a novel]

Gender and Literary Voice

Janet Todd, editor

A lively debate on the question of the feminine voice in literature. Writers examined include Louise Bogan, Olive Schreiner, Hazel Hall, May Sarton, Edith Wharton, Lisa Alther, and Margaret Drabble.    More >

Gender and Literary Voice

Wild Hunter in the Bush of the Ghosts

Amos Tutuola, edited by Bernth Lindfors

The manuscript for this novel, written in 1948, was hidden in a file in London for more than thirty years, until unearthed by Bernth Lindfors. The present edition of the book, its first publication other than a limited facsimile edition in 1982, incorporates minor revisions made by Tutuola during a visit to the United States in 1983, when he corrected obvious errors and restructured several    More >

Another Life: Fully Annotated

Derek Walcott, with a critical essay and comprehensive notes by Edward Baugh and Colbert Nepaulsingh

This near-definitive study sets a new standard for the kind of meticulous scholarship that Nobel laureate Derek Walcott's poetry deserves. Another Life, Walcott's masterpiece of autobiography in verse is an ideal point of entry into Walcott's work. The 200 pages of detailed notes and commentary offered in this annotated edition—drawing to a great extent on unpublished    More >

Another Life: Fully Annotated

Critical Perspectives on Léon Gontran Damas

Keith Q. Warner, editor

Poet, storyteller, scholar, teacher, and statesman, Léon Gontran Damas, born in French Guiana, was a founding father of the negritude movement. This collection offers a wide range of essays on the life and career of Damas from his schooling at home and later in Martinique, through his creative years in Paris as a student, writer, and member of the French Chambres du Deputés, to his    More >

Critical Perspectives on Léon Gontran Damas

The Last Good Freudian

Brenda Webster

The environment of New York City in the post-World War II era was one filled with new ideas and movements. The 1950s saw waves of Freudian disciples set up practices. In The Last Good Freudian, Brenda Webster describes what it was like to grow up in an intellectual and artistic Jewish family during this time. Her father, Wolf Schwabacher, was a prominent entertainment lawyer whose clients    More >

The Last Good Freudian

The Desert Shore: Literatures of the Sahel

Christopher Wise, editor

Though Sahelian culture likely dates back more than five thousand years—encompassing Africa's greatest empires—the Sahel remains little known in the English-speaking world. Redressing this situation, The Desert Shore offers a rich sampling of the contemporary literatures of the region, along with contextualizing chapters by critics from Africa, Europe, and North America. The    More >

The Desert Shore: Literatures of the Sahel

Yambo Ouologuem: Postcolonial Writer, Islamic Militant

Christopher Wise, editor

From the appearance of Bound to Violence in the late 1960s, Yambo Ouologuem has been one of Africa’s most controversial writers. For some critics, the young Malian signaled an entire new direction for African letters: a fiercely courageous postindependence literature. For others, his novel revealed too much, bringing to light horrors many preferred to ignore. Today Ouologuem is credited with    More >

African Lives: An Anthology of Memoirs and Autobiographies

Geoff Wisner, editor

African Lives, a pioneering anthology of memoirs and autobiographical writings, lets the people of Africa speak for themselves—telling stories of struggle and achievement that have the authenticity of lived experience. The anthology presents selections from the work of many of Africa's finest writers and most significant personalities from across the continent and spanning several    More >

African Lives: An Anthology of Memoirs and Autobiographies

Those Magical Years: The Making of Nigerian Literature at Ibadan, 1948-1966

Robert M. Wren

This unique investigation provides the first major account of the explosion of literary talent that began in Nigeria in 1948 and ended as the civil war was intensifying in 1966. The book is structured around interviews with the men and women who led this generation of profound talent, all of whom attended University College, Ibadan, or its successor, the University of Ibadan. Speculating about    More >

Critical Perspectives on Ayi Kwei Armah

Derek Wright, editor

This volume provides a broad and representative selection of critical responses to the work of Ayi Kwei Armah (b. 1939), one of the most provocative and versatile of anglophone West African The essays gathered here are as various as their subject, dealing with such diverse dimensions of Armah’s writing as narrative technique, symbolism and metaphor, mythology, literary ancestry, historical    More >

Singular Stories: Tales from Singapore

Robert Yeo, editor

At the beginning of the 1980s, Singapore’s public relied largely on a literary diet of traditional British and North American authors. By 1990, however, books by Singaporeans were rapidly replacing imports on the bestseller lists and in the review columns. Singular Stories exemplifies the range of the new Singaporean prose. The pieces in this diverse collection explore the conflict between    More >

1,001 Proverbs from Tunisia

Issac Yetiv

The son of a Tunisian Jewish family, Yetiv attempts to preserve some of the wisdom contained in a tradition that may be dying out. Each proverb is presented in transliterated Arabic, with both a literal English translation and an alternative translation that provides a context more familiar to a Western reader.    More >

White Shadows: A Dialectical View of the French African Novel

Carroll Yoder

European colonialists assumed the prerogative to interpret the experiences of their “charges” and to decide the legitimacy of creative expression among Africans. Yoder examines that assumption, frankly discussing the racism and cultural chauvinism of nineteenth-century France, as well as colonial practices and the reactions to them as reflected in West African novels. Using a    More >

The Image of Black Women in Twentieth Century South American Poetry: A Bilingual Anthology

edited and translated by Ann Venture Young

Exploring the negra archetype in literature, this anthology presents the work—both the original Spanish version and the English-language translation—of 15 poets from Colombia, Equador, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela. Young’s extensive introduction traces the black woman’s image from Hispano-Arabic poetry to the 20th century poetry of South America.    More >

Black Shack Alley [a novel]

Joseph Zobel, translated and with an introduction by Keith Q. Warner, with a preface by Christian Filostrat

This work of compelling lyrical unity tells the story of growing up black in the colonial world of Martinique. Not only does the young hero, José, have to fight the ignorance and poverty of plantation life, but he must also learn to survive the all-pervasive French cultural saturation—to remain true to himself, proud of his race and his family. His ally in this struggle is his    More >

The Everlasting Rock [a novel]

Feng Zong-Pu, translated by Aimee Lykes

This political, and darkly romantic novel centers on Mei Puti, a "forty-something" professor of literature, who suffers during the Cultural Revolution because of her heritage as part of the old elite.    More >

The Everlasting Rock [a novel]

The Royal Game and Other Stories

Stefan Zweig translated from the German by Jill Sutcliffe and with an introduction by Jeffrey B. Berlin

Stefan Zweig gained early fame as a poet, translator, and biographer. When he added fiction to his repertoire, he won even more critical acclaim. After his death, however, his work fell inexplicably into obscurity. The Royal Game and Other Stories is a collection of five of Stefan Zweig's brilliant and creative psychological thrillers. Filled with emotional extreme—from obsessive love    More >

The Royal Game and Other Stories